Chemistry
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Visit this website to learn about the basic building blocks of everything, living and nonliving: atoms! Even cooler, read about how they combine to form molecules, like H2O (aka water)! Fill in the crossword puzzle afterwards to test how much you remember.

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Now that you know about atoms, try playing with them in this PheT simulation. You can create elements, test your knowledge of atomic mass, and learn more about the periodic table!

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Now that you know about molecules, watch some of them in action! This video shows how solvents like water are able to dissolve solutes like sugar, to form a solution… and all of these are made up of molecules! Click on this video to learn why solutions are so important to all living things.

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Want to know what else chemistry is good for? Baking! Watch this video to understand what chemical reactions are, and how they are used in daily life. Afterwards, go bake yourself a cake as a tasty, scientific treat!

Turtlediary (Experiment: Salt vs. Pepper): Test out your knowledge of solubility by doing an experiment at home! Follow the instructions in this video to find out which is more soluble in water: salt or pepper.

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Squint Science (Experiment: Chemical Reactions): If you’re looking to test out your newfound chemistry knowledge, here are a few experiments to do with materials you probably have at home! Try putting an egg in vinegar, or pouring nail polish remover on styrofoam, and watch the magic (aka chemistry) happen.

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MITtechTV (Experiment: Charles’ Law): Watch this super cool video that shows Charles’ Law in action: as temperature decreases, so does volume. Then try it at home! You probably don’t have liquid nitrogen, but try putting a balloon in your freezer for a couple hours, and pay attention to the size of it after taking it out… what happens when it’s at room temperature for a couple hours after that?

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Gases have very different properties from one another, but what they all have in common is the way they relate to pressure, volume, and temperature. This video explains some very important laws that all gases follow, with examples you have definitely seen before.